Dan David Foundation

Other Activities

  • Donation of lifesaving and diagnostic equipment for the intensive care ward of the S. Giovanni hospital in Rome, Italy
  • Italia Judaica Project A Documentary History of the Jews in Italy
  • Support for the establishment of a practical studies track in journalism at Tel Aviv University’s School of Communication
  • Grants for research in Biblical Archaeology under the supervision of Prof. Israel Finkelstein, Tel Aviv University. Projects include excavations at Megiddo, the study and interpretation of First Temple epigraphy and the study of the origins and context of Biblical texts.
  • Grants awarded through the School of History at Tel Aviv University to support postdoctoral researchers, graduate students and conferences.
  • Misliya, Israel / Dan David Laboratory Dedicated to The Search and Study of Modern Humans. An ongoing Prehistoric archaeological site on the side of the Carmel Mountain The site is sponsored by the Dan David Foundation.
  • Special Kindergarten for children with behavioral problem A pledge made to Keren Hayesod (United Jewish Appeal) and Prof. Theodore Iancu and Mrs. Daisy Iancu for the creation, in Haifa, of a kindergarten for Jewish and Arab children with behavioral problems, especially autism, supervised by Daisy Iancu.
  • Sponsorship of activities of the Faculty of the Arts, Tel Aviv University, the Cameri Theatre, Tel Aviv and the Israeli Opera, Tel Aviv.
  • Support of The Dan David Foundation for Medical Research
    The Milman Fund for Pediatric Research The Pediatric Research and Electron Microscopy Unit, Haifa, Israel
  • Manot, Israel / Dan David Laboratory

    The excavation at Manot Cave was initiated and supported throughout the years by the late Dan David, founder of the ‘Dan David Prize’, and his son Ariel David.

    The ongoing research is financially supported by the Dan David Foundation. 

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  • Tel Aviv University team, sponsored by The Dan David Foundation, provides unprecedented glimpse into eating and cooking habits of paleolithic man.

    A 400,000-year-old set of teeth, discovered in a cave outside of Tel Aviv, has revealed new information about the daily life of prehistoric man.

    The teeth found at Qesem Cave outside of Tel Aviv (Courtesy: Prof. Israel Hershkovitz/Tel Aviv University)

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