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A 4mm square gold-coated microneedle array next to a 31-gauge needle used to extract fluid. Photo: Alexandra Depelsenaire - The Courier
A 4mm square gold-coated microneedle array next to a 31-gauge needle used to extract fluid. Photo: Alexandra Depelsenaire - The Courier
Science fiction is rapidly becoming reality. Australian scientists have developed a patch that can detect disease using microneedle technology that targets the tiny blood vessels in the upper layers of the skin. In mice trials, diseases were detected within an hour. The researchers believe the technology will be most useful in remote areas that lack diagnostic facilities. This will have knock-on effects: the ability to quickly and easily detect malaria, for instance, can help prevent overtreatment in people that don't have it.

(Nanoscience is one of the categories for the 2016 Dan David Prize. Learn more here: selected fields 2016 - Future: Nanoscience

Read the article "UQ team develops needle-free disease detection through nanotechnology patch " - The Courier