Prof. Amnon Shashua is the CEO and co-founder of Mobileye, an Israeli company that develops vision-based self-driving car technology and advanced driver-assistance systems.

In 2014, the company claimed the title of the largest ever Israeli IPO and in 2017, when the company was purchased by Intel, the deal became the largest Israeli acquisition to date.

Currently, more than 55 million cars around the world are powered by Mobileye.

In 2017, Shashua was named Senior Vice President of Intel Corp. and serves on its Executive Leadership Team.

In 2010, Shashua co-founded OrCam, which harnesses computer vision and natural language processing to assist the visually impaired and blind. OrCam’s product was listed among TIME Magazine’s 100 best inventions of 2019. Since then, he has co-founded two new AI-based startup companies in the areas of natural language understanding and digital banking.

In addition to his business achievements, Shashua is also a professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he holds the Sachs Chair in Computer Science. He has published over 120 papers in Artificial Intelligence fields of machine learning and computer vision and holds over 45 patents.

Prof. Shashua’s scientific contributions have generated multiple best-paper awards at the top venues of computer vision and machine learning. He pioneered the use of tensor analysis to computer vision and machine learning and has contributed to the understanding of the foundations of deep learning. His recent work has even been published at top theoretical physics venues.

In 2019 Shashua was recognized as the Electronic Imaging (EI) Scientist of the Year by the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T) for his pivotal contributions to computer vision and machine learning. For his contributions to advanced driver assistance technology, Shashua and his team from Mobileye were finalists in the European Inventor Awards of 2019, awarded by the European Patent Office. On Israeli Independence Day 2017, Shashua was chosen for one of the highest honors in Israeli society, to light a torch at the national ceremony on Mt. Herzl.